Course Descriptions

PSY 500 Abnormal Psychology
Summer/Fall – Doerfler, 3 credits
This course provides a comprehensive overview of the main forms of emotional disorder, with a special focus on description and analysis of the experiential world of the patient. The most important theoretical approaches to “mental illness” are compared and contrasted so that the student gains a critical appreciation of the differing insights provided by the various approaches.  

PSY 502 Psychology of Development
Fall/Spring – Kalpidou, 3 credits
This course examines normative development and optimal functioning from infancy through adulthood. Particular emphasis is placed on how current research and developmental theories impact assessments of and interventions with children, adolescents, and adults who deviate from the normal course of development. Developmental changes across the life span are traced and factors that foster development including biological, familial, and cultural influences are explored with special consideration of risk and protective factors in development.

PSY 504 Psychological Measurement
Summer/Fall – Volungis, 3 credits
An introduction to the instruments and the methods used in the measurement and evaluation of the psychological characteristics of human beings, including elementary principles of statistical analysis.  

PSY 600 Counseling (Principles and Practices)  
Summer/Fall – Bozicas, 3 credits
Examine basic approaches, principles, and procedures of counseling. Students engage in some directed role playing of counseling techniques as well as prepare a class demonstration based on their personal integration of readings and practice. Research related to counseling as well as issues regarding the nature of the counseling relationship are considered.
Prerequisites: PSY 500 and PSY 501, may be taken concurrently

PSY 604 Ethical Principles for Counselors
Fall/Spring – Weagraff, 3 credits
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a working knowledge of ethical issues in mental health care practice. The course will consider the manner in which governing principles of health care ethics are articulated within the general values and specific prescriptions/proscriptions (legal and moral) which constitute current moral wisdom of the mental health professional. Ethical codes of the American Counseling Association, American Mental Health Counselors Association, and the American Psychological Association will be examined. Lectures, case analysis, class discussion of assigned readings, and written assignments will provide both the conceptual and practical tools for addressing the critical ethical issues which arise in your practice.

PSY 620 Lifestyle, School, and Career Development  
TBA Doerfler, 3 credits
This course will provide the theoretical foundation and the practical experience necessary to understand and foster the career/lifestyle development for counseling clients. Students will be prepared with the necessary knowledge and skills to collect, evaluate, and use occupational and life development data in helping individual clients and various client populations to make effective decisions and take effective appropriate actions in their career/life.  

PSY 627 Issues in Professional Practice
Spring/Summer – Volungis, 3 credits
This course is designed to introduce the clinical counseling psychology student to the varied facets of professional practice and development. It begins with an in‐depth study of the Massachusetts law on the Requirements for Licensure as a Mental Health Counselor covering topics from educational to pre‐ and post‐masters supervised practice requirements. Other topics covered include the history and reasons behind professional regulation in the mental health professions, the licensing exam, job searching, specialization of practice, continued education and training, private practice considerations, and licensing laws in other states. A major emphasis is on helping the student explore professional identity issues by asking such questions as “What does it mean to be a counseling psychologist?” “What skills do I have and what role do I play as a member of a multidisciplinary treatment team?” “What professional organizations should I belong to? Why?” “What is the difference between a profession and a job?”

PSY 630 Cultural Competencies in Counseling
Spring/Summer – Fessenden, 3 credits
Competent mental health professionals must use culturally appropriate intervention strategies when working with a diverse clientele. The purpose of this course is to foster the development of multicultural competence in counseling practices. The course is designed to promote the awareness of cultural factors that can affect counseling practices, knowledge about various cultural backgrounds and experiences. Issues to be addressed in this course include prejudice, racism, oppression, and discrimination that affect individuals from various racial or ethnic groups, elders, individuals with disabilities, women, gay men, and lesbians.
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 501, PSY 600

PSY 650 Research Seminar
Spring/Summer – Volungis, 3 credits
This course provides students with the conceptual tools necessary to design and critically evaluate research in the areas of psychology and counseling. Problems in methodology are explored through readings, discussion, and involvement in research.   
Prerequisite: PSY 504

PSY 660 Special Topics Seminar in Clinical Counseling Psychology
TBA ‐ TBA, 3 credits
This course is designed to provide students with contemporary topics and issues in psychotherapy. Topics will be chosen on timeliness, interest, and relevance to current psychological practice. The course will allow students the opportunity to examine current issues with greater detail than would be possible in other course offerings.
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 600

PSY 701 Marital Therapy
Summer – Bozicas, 3 credits
This course focuses on contemporary theoretical approaches to couples therapy. The major theoretical models include: family of origin/relational; cognitive/behavioral; and communication. Theory, case studies, and simulation are the basis for class interaction in seminar format. Each student has the responsibility to begin formulating an organized theoretical approach to treating couples.
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 600, PSY 708

PSY 702 Advanced Family Therapy
Summer – Kuersten‐Hogan, 3 credits
This course will focus on understanding interactional patterns and influences from the perspective of major family therapy paradigms. Consideration of family treatment for both adult and child clinical presentations will be examined. In addition to the theoretical introduction, the course will cover practical topics such as when to choose family treatment, dealing with the beginning therapist’s anxieties, assessing interactional styles, structuring initial treatment sessions, developing a treatment focus, and the basic treatment skills.   
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 600, PSY 708

PSY 705 Group Approaches to Counseling and Psychotherapy
Fall/Spring – Kuersten‐Hogan, 3 credits
This course is designed to provide a theoretical understanding of group development, purpose, and dynamics. Through reading and discussion, different approaches to the use of groups will be explored. Issues related to group counseling methods, skills, and leadership styles will be examined. This course will cover a range of groups that are used by
mental health counselors (e.g., therapeutic, psychosocial, psychoeducational).
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 600, PSY 708

PSY 708 Cognitive Assessment and Psychotherapy
Fall/Spring – Volungis, 3 credits
The focus of this course is on a psychotherapeutic understanding of cognitive structure and content as it influences the client’s perceptions, emotional states, and behavior. The theory and practice of Kelly, Beck, Meichenbaum, and Ellis receive systematic treatment. Personal construct assessment, cognitive modification, stress inoculation training, self‐instructional methods, and cognitive restructuring techniques receive special emphasis.
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 600

PSY 711 Cognitive‐Behavioral Assessment of Children
Spring – Kennedy/Kuersten‐Hogan, 3 credits
This course reviews the basic principles underlying the assessment of children’s behavior and psychological adjustment using a cognitive‐behavioral and developmental theoretical framework. Special considerations when working with children will be reviewed along with specific attention directed toward: (1) ethics, (2) behavioral observation/coding systems, (3) rating scales, (4) use of self‐report with children, and (5) interviews. Students will receive instruction in choosing an appropriate instrument, designing a multi‐method assessment battery, interpreting test results, and writing reports. The important link between assessment and treatment planning and evaluating treatment outcome will be stressed as well.  
Prerequisites: PSY 502, PSY 504, PSY 708; PSY 502 and PSY 504 may be taken concurrently

PSY 712 Cognitive‐Behavioral Interventions with Children
Summer – Volungis, 3 credits
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with a variety of therapeutic techniques designed to address childhood difficulties. A framework for evaluating and choosing a treatment approach and a brief overview of diagnostic classification systems and their relevance to treatment will be provided. Practical techniques will be reviewed including: interviewing, interventions for working with parents, for consulting to schools, intervening with common childhood developmental problems (e.g., enuresis/encopresis) as well as more extreme psychological difficulties such as anxiety disorders, conduct disorders, and abuse. Cognitive‐behavioral treatment approaches that have been empirically supported will be emphasized, and the advantages and disadvantages of techniques discussed within a developmental framework.
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 502, PSY 504, PSY 600, PSY 708, PSY 711

PSY 713 Cognitive Therapy for Family of Origin Problems
Fall – Bozicas, 3 credits
This course presents a cognitive model for treating survivors of traumatic and/or dysfunctional family of origin circumstances. Topics to be covered include assessment issues, dysfunctional schemata, information processing deficits, the use of affect, the use of the therapeutic relationship, transference and countertransference issues, strengthening boundaries and building coping strategies.
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 600, PSY 708

PSY 715 Cognitive‐Behavioral Assessment of Adults
Spring – Doerfler, 3 credits
This course reviews the basic principles that guide assessment of clinical problems using a cognitive‐behavioral framework. Students will learn about several assessment strategies including behavioral observation, self‐report, self‐monitoring, and structured interviews and rating scales. Special attention will be paid to the assessment of anxiety, depression, addictive behaviors, social skills, and marital dysfunction. The important link between assessment and treatment planning, and evaluating treatment outcome will be stressed as well.
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 504, PSY 600, PSY 708; PSY 504 may be taken concurrently

PSY 716 Cognitive‐Behavioral Interventions for Depression and Anxiety
Summer – Doerfler, 3 credits
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with cognitive‐behavioral theories of the etiology and treatment of depression and anxiety. Topics to be covered include the diagnosis of depressive and anxiety disorders, principles of cognitive and behavioral assessment, evaluation of suicidal ideation and behavior, and therapeutic techniques to alleviate depression and anxiety. Cognitive‐behavioral approaches that have been empirically validated will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 600, PSY 708

PSY 718 Psychological Interventions for Addictive Behaviors
Spring – Doerfler, 3 credits
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with psychological theories of the etiology and treatment of addictive behaviors. Topics covered include the diagnosis of addictive behaviors (alcohol and drug abuse, tobacco use), pharmacological effects of various substances, principles of psychological assessment, evaluation of clients’ motivation to change, and therapeutic techniques for changing addictive behaviors. Interventions that are most strongly supported by outcome research will be emphasized in this course.
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 600, PSY 708

PSY 720 Systems Interventions with Children
Fall – Kennedy, 3 credits
This course will offer an opportunity to explore clinical interventions with children and adolescents within the major contexts influencing their development and mental health – their families, schools, communities, and legal system. Emphasizing the fact that children and youth are particularly susceptible and dependent upon their environments, this course will attempt to provide the student with an appreciation of how these influence a child’s personal identity and actual behavior as well as an understanding of the need to take these into account in developing viable clinical interventions.
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 502, PSY 600, PSY 708

PSY 727 Assessment and Treatment of ADHD
Spring – Bozicas/Murphy, 3 credits
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the nature, diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in children, adolescents, and adults. As part of this overview, various empirical, clinical, and controversial issues will be discussed and critically examined within a developmental framework. Students will be exposed to materials which will help them answer the following questions: What is ADHD? Is it a real disorder? Are we over-diagnosing and over‐medicating children? Do we have reliable and valid methods of diagnosing it? What are the best ways of assessing and treating ADHD? How does ADHD differ in children and adults? How does ADHD interact with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)? This course will cover child, adolescent, and adult presentations of this disorder and present empirically‐supported interventions specific to each population. An overview of psychopharmacological treatments as well as specific   parent‐training programs will be discussed. Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 600, PSY 708

PSY 728 Psychopharmacology for Counselors
Fall/Spring – Moran, 3 credits
This course is designed to provide mental health counselors with a practical overview of the most commonly prescribed psychiatric medications. Psychotropic medications are considered to be important treatments for many psychological disorders and these drugs are often combined with psychotherapy for the treatment of a wide range of psychological disorders. Even though medication decisions are made by professionals who are trained in medicine and licensed to prescribe drugs, it is beneficial for mental health counselors, psychologists, and social workers to have a thorough knowledge of how psychotropic medications are used and how they work in the human body. This course will cover significant medical aspects of the use of these drugs, including indications based on diagnosis, physiological functions, side effects, and criteria for evaluating client response and recommending further treatment or reevaluation.  
Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 600, PSY 708

PSY 790 Professional Integrative Seminar
Fall – Kuersten‐Hogan/Volungis/Doerfler, 3 credits
This course is designed to facilitate the synthesis and integration of theory, practice, and research related to psychotherapy. Special attention will be paid to issues of case conceptualization, psychological assessment, and the efficacy of psychotherapy. In addition, students will be encouraged to develop a more sophisticated understanding of psychological interventions for specific psychosocial problems and difficulties.
Prerequisites: PSY 708, PSY 801 for MA candidates

PSY 800 Directed Study
Summer/Fall/Spring – Staff, 3 credits
Individually supervised study and projects with program advisor where appropriate. Students may take no more than two directed studies.  

PSY 801 Counseling Practicum
Summer –Bozicas/Rosen, 4 credits
Counseling Practicum involves placement in a clinical setting to enable students to develop basic counseling skills and integrate professional knowledge and skills. Counseling Practicum provides an opportunity to perform, on a limited basis and under supervision, some of the activities that a mental health counselor would perform. In addition to the supervised practicum, this course involves a weekly seminar. Prior permission of the Practicum Coordinator is required in order to arrange for a practicum setting appropriate to the student’s academic and career goals.
Prerequisites: Consent of the Practicum Coordinator and completion of PSY 500, PSY 600

PSY 802 Counseling Internship I (Clinic Setting)
Fall –Bozicas/Rosen, 4 credits
Internship involves placement in a clinical setting to enable students to work with clients under professional supervision and to acquaint students with the structure, operation, and procedures of a clinical setting. The internship is intended to enable the student to refine and enhance basic counseling skills, develop more advanced counseling skills, and integrate professional knowledge and skills appropriate to the student’s career goals. In addition to the supervised field experience, this course involves a weekly seminar. Prior permission of the Internship Coordinator is required in order to arrange for an internship setting appropriate to the student’s academic and career goals.   
Prerequisites: Consent of the Internship Coordinator and completion of PSY 801, and two advanced (700‐level) counseling courses

PSY 803 Counseling Internship II (Clinic Setting)
Spring –Bozicas/Rosen, 4 credits
Internship involves placement in a clinical setting to enable students to work with clients under professional supervision and to acquaint students with the structure, operation, and procedures of a clinical setting. The internship is intended to enable the student to refine and enhance basic counseling skills, develop more advanced counseling skills, and integrate professional knowledge and skills appropriate to the student’s career goals. In addition to the supervised field experience, this course involves a weekly seminar. Prior permission of the Internship Coordinator is required in order to arrange for an internship setting appropriate to the student’s academic and career goals.
Prerequisites: Consent of the Internship Coordinator and completion of PSY 801, PSY 802, and two advanced (700‐level) counseling courses

PSY 811 Advanced Counseling Practicum
Summer –Bozicas/Rosen, 4 credits
Advanced Counseling Practicum involves placement in a clinical setting to enable students to develop counseling skills and integrate professional knowledge and skills. Advanced Counseling Practicum provides an opportunity to perform some of the activities that a mental health counselor would perform under the direct supervision of a licensed mental health professional. In addition to the supervised practicum, the course involves a weekly seminar. Prior permission of the Practicum/Internship Coordinator is required in order to arrange a practicum placement that is appropriate to the student’s academic and career goals.
Prerequisites: Consent of the Practicum Coordinator and completion of PSY 500, PSY 600, or their equivalent

PSY 812 Advanced Counseling Internship I (Clinic Setting)
Fall –Bozicas/Rosen, 4 credits
Advanced Counseling Internship involves placement in a clinical setting to enable students to work with clients under professional supervision and to acquaint students with the structure, operation, and procedures of a clinical setting. The internship is intended to enable the student to refine and develop more advanced counseling skills and to integrate professional knowledge and skills appropriate to the student’s career goals. In addition to the supervised field experience, this course involves a weekly seminar. Prior permission of the Practicum/Internship Coordinator is required in order to arrange an internship placement that is appropriate to the student’s academic and career goals.
Prerequisites: Consent of the Practicum/Internship Coordinator and completion of PSY 811 and two advanced (700‐level) counseling courses

PSY 813 Advanced Counseling Internship II (Clinic Setting)
Spring –Bozicas/Rosen, 4 credits
Advanced Counseling Internship involves placement in a clinical setting to enable students to work with clients under professional supervision and to acquaint students with the structure, operation, and procedures of a clinical setting. The internship is intended to enable the student to refine and develop more advanced counseling skills and to integrate professional knowledge and skills appropriate to the student’s career goals. In addition to the supervised field experience, this course involves a weekly seminar. Prior permission of the Practicum/Internship Coordinator is required in order to arrange an internship placement that is appropriate to the student’s academic and career goals.
Prerequisites: Consent of the Practicum Coordinator and completion of PSY 811, PSY 812 and two advanced (700‐level) counseling courses